The T-shirt is the problem

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This work plays off the concept of a textile trade show creating an immersive environment for visitors to learn about the global production of the t-shirt, and how to up cycle, reuse and extend the life of the t-shirt.

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Mapping Manufacturing area is a series of large scale chalk drawings, mapping the global production of the t-shirt and an pile of t-shirts donated by visitors to the exhibition.

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Leisure Time for Personal Production area consists of a collection of up cycled t-shirt samples; rugs, basket cookers, and t-shirt shopping bags. Secondly there will be an instructional video of how to make a incubated basket cooker, with a work table for participants to make their own basket.

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Made in Los Angeles

This work plays off the concept of a trade show to create an immersive environment for visitors to learn about textile and apparel manufacturing in Los Angeles. The work will consist of a three-room installation,

Mapping Manufacturing Room

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Leisure Time for Personal Production Room,

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and

Frau Fiber Vs. the Industrial Sock Knitting video.

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Exploring the precarious strong hold of Los Angeles textile and garment producers and their reach in the United States and globally.   While simultaneously making time and providing instructions for participants join in the assembly line of American Apparel Ultra Wash Tee knock off production.

Textile Tourism: Valdese Weavers

Valdese Weavers offered The Peoples Cloth, a course called Textiles 101. It was an intensive four hour workshop, explaining the design processes, dying, weaving and finishing.  This in-depth experience is used for training their customers and sales partners so they have a better understanding of the weaving process.

Valdese weaves about 40,000 yards of good a day and non of them are the same.  They are  vertically integrated mill, and their speciality is they can turn around an order in 27 days.  All goods are woven to order.

 

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Textile Tourism: The Oriole Mill

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Frau Fiber introduces Bethanne and Stephan

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Kelly takes the lead of this mighty tour

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The wrapping room

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The weave room

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Stephan Michelson – Owner and Co-founder

Bethanne Knudson – Co-founder and Design Director

Kelly Hopkin – Director of Production

Sarah Edney – Production Assistant

Barry Conner – Overhauler

Nancy Webb – Production Assistant

Josh Durham – Weaver

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Libby introduces Sew Co.

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The tour group!

 

 

Textile Tourism: Echoview Fiber Mill

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Frau Fiber and 11 textile tourist were lead on a journey through wool processing by Ken Simpson, the Echoview mill manager.

Frau Fiber began the tour with introductions by textile tourists, who were there for a variety of reasons, craft, industry and politically related. Frau opened the tour with these comments,

“The American wool supply chain from sheet to yarn to final product is leaner than in decades past.  Most wool from American sheep can be scratchy, it’s not the fiber of Australian animals.  The difference is because most US sheep are raised for food, not wool.  However, the domestic wool industry is seeing small shifts.  Domestic innovators like Echoview fiber mill allow for the creation of softer fibers made with tougher yarn.  Sm-Mid sized businesses are revealing it’s no longer cost effective to outsource materials from countries like China.  Using a word of mouth net work of yarn producers, spinners, dyers, and scrappy entrepreneurs, these businesses are keeping made in the USA wool tradition alive.

 

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Weavers Knot workshop with Barry G. Conner

The weaver’s knot is a small, quickly tied knot that becomes tighter the more it is pulled to slip easily through the heddles and reed in a loom. Barry G. Conner, weaving technician at The Oriole Mill and overhauler with 23 years textile production experience in North Carolina, will be demonstrating this technique and discussing the textile industry and its changes.

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The Peoples Circular Knitting

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Circular knitting is a type of knitting which creates a seamless tube.

Circular knitting can be used to make socks and t-shirts.

Circular knitting by machine produces a more even textured product then when produced by hand.

The Luddites – 19th century English textile workers who protested against labor-economizing techniques of stocking frame, spinning frame and power looms in 1811-1816, which introduced the industrial revolution which treated (did) replace the artisans with less-skilled low-wage laborers, leaving the artisans with no work.

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The Peoples Brooks Brothers

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Knock off cut and sew production of a Brooks Brothers shirt.

Cut and Sew is a system of manufacturing in which shaped pieces are cut from a layer of fabric and stitched together to form a garment.

Cut and Sew is used in the production of Brooks Brothers shirts.

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Collaborative perseverance, Beau and Tim spent 20 hours producing this shirt.